For some years now, whenever my students were speaking in pairs or groups, I would write down comments I would like to make on my iPad: I would go around, monitor their conversations, and jot down ideas as they came up. These would typically include a mixture of grammar, vocabulary, or pronunciation mistakes, or simply alternatives I could provide to what they were saying. I would also add further ideas that occurred to me while listening to them. Then, I would project my notes and give feedback to my students following those notes in that ‘chronological’ order.

I was more or less happy with that system, but somehow I felt I could be more organised. That’s how I came up with this chart: it is based on a single-point rubric with four criteria (vocabulary range and control, grammatical accuracy and range, phonological control, and discourse). Rather than descriptors, I can write my comments under each of the headings: ‘needs improvement’ and ‘not quite there yet’ on the left-hand side, as ‘areas for concern’, and ‘suggestions’ (=alternatives, synonyms..) and ‘good!’ (expressions I liked) as positive comments on the right-hand side.

Using this chart allows me to give feedback on their spoken productions and interactions in a more organised way, making all the comments about one particular item (vocabulary, pronunciation…) at once, rather than randomly as they came up in their conversations.

You can download the chart by clicking on the image below. It is a work in progress, so contributions are welcome!

An alternative version of this can be used to give individual feedback on, for example, short videos or audio recordings. If their output is not too long, it might be easier for students to find the comments on their mistakes/slips in the same order as they can be found in the recording.

Click on the screenshot or here to open the pdf file

(Updated 30.1.23)

Related posts: giving feedback to students’ written production- workshop materials