Unrequited love letter

The exercise below was created as part of our sessions on love and relationships. The objective of this particular exercise was twofold: first, we wanted to show our students that pop songs can be an excellent way to improve your vocabulary. So we came up with this “love letter”.

Besides, it can be done and self-checked by students on their own, in case they’re not able to come to class on that day, or want to do it again some time later to revise vocabulary. The quiz has been created using GoConqr, which teachers can use for their own classes, whatever their subject may be.

Click on the picture. Then, drag and drop the words to the suitable gaps to complete this love letter.

Most of the expressions have been taken from pop songs, which goes to show how useful they can be when learning English. Most of the songs can be found on the playlists in this post.

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Relationships: love, family, friends playlists

This week’s topic at the CARLEE is that of relationships, be it within romantic love, in the shape of friendships or family relations. To get you started, here are some Spotify playlists for each topic:

https://play.spotify.com/user/natalialzam/playlist/4oqftqS896xwL9dkJ5I98c

 

Crime and the Law- related music, books, films and TV shows

If you want to increase your vocabulary to talk about crime and the law, you can listen to the songs on this playlist (or any others):

You can also watch any of these films:

  • Witness For The Prosecution (Billy Wilder 1957) [Good depiction of the British legal system, based on a play by Agatha Christie]

  • Rear Window (Alfred Hitchcock 1954) [Alleged murder]

  • To Catch a Thief (Alfred Hitchcock 1955) [romance / thriller about a retired thief / cat burglar]

  • Take The Money and Run (Woody Allen 1969) [hilarious comedy about a petty thief who always gets caught]
  • A Few Good Men (Rob Reiner 1992) [courtroom drama about the US Marines in Guantanamo]

TV SHOWS:

Monty Python’s Flying Circus (BBC 1969-1974)- They had many different sketches dealing with crimes and criminals, among which you can watch:

Blackadder Goes Forth (BBC 1989)- Court Martial

Sherlock (BBC 2010-2017). Excellent show. Can’t comment any more.

https://ororo.tv/en/shows/sherlock

Finally, Roald Dahl wrote several short stories for adults, some of which have to do with crimes. You may read “Lamb to the Slaughter“, for example, or “The Landlady“. You can also watch TV episodes based on the stories.

Alfred Hitchcock Presents- “Lamb to the Slaughter” (directed by Alfred Hitchcock, script by Roald Dahl based on his own short story):

Tales of the Unexpected (Anglia Television)- The Landlady (introduced by Roald Dahl):

Pronunciation practice /h/, /p/, /t/,/k/

You may watch the Alphablocks videos we used today here. Click on the links:

If you want to try the same phonemic chart I used in class, you may visit this website (scroll down the page to see the chart)

Homework: watch and listen to Adele’s song “Hello”. Spot as many words containing the sound /h/ as you can.

Please pay attention to the way she pronounces them. You may sing along to the song as well! (that’s why you have the lyrics)

 

 

Penny Lane

Yes, you were right! Penny Lane is a song by The Beatles, based on a street in Liverpool by the same name. It’s one of my favourite ones. So, obviously, when I was in Liverpool, I walked down Penny Lane, and had my photo taken next to the street sign.

Click on the picture to listen to the song.

penny-lane

 

On that same topic, one of the year 1 students was wearing this T-shirt today:

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That’s one sure way of keeping this teacher very happy!