ideas para utilizar iPads en clase

En esta Google site he recogido algunas de las ideas, trucos y consejos para utilizar el iPad como docente, o con los alumnos. En ella hay ideas para sacarle el máximo partido al Apple pencil, para escribir como en una pizarra digital, escribir encima de documentos y páginas web, anotar imágenes…

Podéis acceder en este enlace.

Tools to check whether language sounds natural or not, and to improve the level of a production

  • Dictionaries: some of the dictionaries I tend to recommend at B2 level and upwards are the Cambridge Dictionary (https://dictionary.cambridge.org/) and the Oxford Thesaurus (https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/, choose ‘Thesaurus’ in the dropdown menu). Ideas on how to use a dictionary here to improve writing tasks here: https://natalialzam.wordpress.com/2016/12/06/how-to-improve-your-writing-tasks-b2-c1/  
  • Grammarly (https://www.grammarly.com):  Add-on which checks for spelling mistakes, and suggests possible grammar mistakes through Artificial Intelligence. Its suggestions tend to be accurate/useful. 
  • Fraze.it (https://fraze.it): A database of online newspapers and magazines which may come in handy when trying to make sure that a given collocation sounds natural. Type your collocation into the search box, and if it can find those words, it will yield real examples where this expression appears. Once there, you can also click for more context. If your collocation exists, you will find a list of examples; if it does not, or is not very frequent, no or very few examples will appear.
  • Flax (http://flax.nzdl.org/greenstone3/flax?a=fp&sa=collAbout&c=collocations): enter a word, and how words form into collocational patterns will be revealed by looking across different academic and social corpora.

The following links provide further ideas and resources on how to check whether the language produced sounds natural, or to widen the range of vocabulary used to meet the requirements of B2-C1-C2 levels:

Tools to improve pronunciation and phonological control

ICT tools and apps to record/promote spoken production and co-production/interaction

School refusers- listening comprehension

Listen to this clip from Woman’s Hour about children and teenagers who refuse to go to school. Then answer the questions on the google form below. You can listen to the clip twice:

 

 

Open form in a new tab

Pay attention to the feedback given to both right and wrong answers.

You can finally listen again and read the transcript:

Listening- Alan Turing to feature on the 50 GBP note

Some months ago, there was a consultation in the UK about the candidates to feature on the new £50 banknotes. You can read more about it and do a listening comprehension exercise on the news here:

Listening comprehension: The new £50 note.

The winner has been announced, and mathematician Alan Turing has been chosen as the face of Britain’s new £50 banknote.

Now, read the questions in the form below. Then, listen to this news report about the mathematician who is going to feature on the new £50 note. You can listen to it twice. Once you have finished, submit your answers to check whether you were right or wrong. Please pay attention to the feedback to both right and wrong answers.

Open form in a new tab

You can also read the transcript here.

Further reading:

More about Alan Turing in the blog:

English idioms which might be offensive to vegans: same language mediation in speech

There was a news item in the UK recently on the fact that vegans are complaining that they find some English idioms offensive, and are suggesting alternative idioms. Can you see their point? How do you feel about their proposals?

  1. Listen to this clip dealing with why vegans object to some idioms and suggest alternative idioms instead:
Source

You can also read this article about the same story.

2. Look up the idiom(s) you have been assigned. Then, a) find a picture which describes it visually; b) record a short explanation of what the original idiom means. You can use Talk and Comment, or any voice recording app.

  • Let the cat out of the bag
  • Take the bull by the horns
  • There’s more than one way to skin a cat
  • Flog a dead horse
  • Bring home the bacon
  • Put all your eggs in one basket
  • Be a guinea pig
  • Has the cat got your tongue?

Upload both the picture and your explanation to this padlet:

Made with Padlet

Once the padlet is complete, listen to your classmates’ explanations and pictures. How effective was their mediation? Is the meaning clear for you now? You can rate their contributions on the padlet. You can also add further comments (text or audio comments).