Taller: Mediación lingüística 101

En 2018 se publicó el Companion Volume, volumen complementario al Marco Común Europeo de Referencia para las Lenguas (2001). En él se actualizan descriptores ya existentes en el Marco, se incluyen nuevos relacionados, por ejemplo, con la comunicación online, y se añaden descriptores para mediación lingüística. Estos cambios se han incorporado ya en las pruebas de certificación de la Escuelas Oficiales de Idiomas. 

En este taller de dos horas de duración se darán ideas generales para comenzar a conocer el concepto de mediación lingüística, y cómo se puede trabajar en el aula de lengua extranjera tanto en secundaria como en Escuelas de Idiomas. Se realizará el 14 de marzo de 2020, dentro del CARLEE on Tour (Teruel)

CONTENIDOS:

  • Actualización del MCER: modos de comunicación, descriptores 
  • Mediación lingüística: oral, escrita/ interlingüística, intralingüística
  • Ideas básicas para el diseño de actividades de mediación para el aula y para examen . Diferencias mediación/interacción.

Mediation in speaking-love and relationships (C1)

St. Valentine’s day is coming, and whether you celebrate it or not, it can be an excuse as any other to practise students’ mediating skills. As the Companion Volume says ‘in mediation, one is less concerned with one’s own needs, ideas or expression, than with those of the party or parties for whom one is mediating‘ (p.106).  With this in mind, it is very easy to think of tasks where the mediator is asked to help/give advice to somebody who is having a rough time in their relationship, missing their former partner…

Two possible cross-linguistic mediation tasks for C1 English can be found below. They are aimed at developing the following descriptor:

Can summarise clearly in well-structured speech (in Language B) the main points made in complex spoken and written texts (in Language A) in fields of specialisation other than his/her own, although he/she may occasionally check particular technical concepts.

Click on the screenshot to download the pdf file

 

Click on the screenshot to download the pdf file

 

 

Materiales taller “El Companion Volume y las tareas de mediación en secundaria”

En este enlace podéis acceder a la presentación del taller “El Companion Volume y las tareas de mediación en secundaria”, celebrado el 8 de enero de 2020 en el CARLEE (Zaragoza):

Click en la imagen para descargar pdf

En estos videos tenéis esa misma presentación junto con el audio de la sesión:

Estas son algunas tareas de mediación, que pueden servir como ejemplo (B1):

 

Click en la imagen para descargar pdf

C2 mediation in speech- Christmas in Spain

The mediation-in-speech paper in the EE.OO.II. in Aragón includes a cross-linguistic mediation task: students receive a text, infographic, chart…in Spanish, and they have to mediate it into the target language, in our case, English.

As we are dealing with Christmas-related topics these days in class, I thought of using two articles in Spanish around two controversial matters that have hit the headlines recently: the Nativity scene in Barcelona and the Christmas display in Vigo.

The context I provided students with is the following: These days you are hosting an Erasmus visit in your school. There are Greek, French and Turkish teachers in the group. The common language you are using is English. They have heard something about the news, but don’t really know what all the fuss is about, so they would like to know more about the subject. Help them understand what is happening, and what the controversy is all about. 

These are the CV descriptors I wanted to work on:

  • Relaying specific information in speech: Can explain (in Language B) the relevance of specific information found in a particular section of a long, complex text (written in Language A) (p.107).
  • Facilitating pluricultural space: Can mediate effectively and naturally between members of his/her own and other communities, taking account of socio-cultural and sociolinguistic differences (p. 123).

The strategies I imagined students should be using are:

  • streamlining a text
  • adapting language
  • linking to previous knowledge

Some possible language they can use can be found here.

After carrying out the tasks in class, I realised I could provide them with a WAGOLL (What a Good One Looks Like), a sample task which could work as a model for them to see what aspects they should have been concentrating on, and a possible mediation sample. That is why I came up with a Thinglink poster for the article on the nativity scene: First, I highlighted content and key words that I felt were relevant. Then, I took a screenshot of the text, which I uploaded to Thinglink. Then I added links with text comments, stressing what points were essential, and therefore should be mentioned, as well as some cultural points that may need explaining for the hearer to be able to get the full picture. Finally, on the microphone icon, I added a link to a recording of myself mediating the text.

 

Click on the image to open Thinglink (opens in a new tab)

Transcript of the recording here

To be honest, I am not sure this can be regarded as a ‘good’ mediation task. But hopefully, it will help students come to terms with the kind of strategies they should be using, and perhaps give them some idea of expressions they can use when faced with these tasks.

 

Cross-linguistic mediation: Easter-related idioms in Spanish explained in English

During the Easter break, I came across this post on Twitter:

Click on the picture to visit the authors’ blog.

So I thought that could be used as the input for a cross-linguistic mediation activity, to mediate communication, as well as the cultural and historical background involved in those Spanish idioms.

I started this padlet with those ten Spanish idioms. Then, I asked my students to give a short explanation of what they mean, intended for foreign students of Spanish. I asked them to record themselves using the Chrome extension/Android app Talk and Comment, which allows you to record short audio comments, and immediately creates a link. That way, their audio recording could be pasted as a link straight to the padlet, without having to upload their recording anywhere else and then create a link. They could also record it using any recording app, and then upload it to padlet.

Alternatively, students were also allowed to simply type a comment with their explanation.

(Open the padlet in a new window to see all the idioms)

Made with Padlet

Since the main reasons to mediate are to help the other speaker understand, to be helpful to them, and to be mindful of their needs (not those of the mediator), what I am asking from you now is: once my students have explained these idioms, can you give them feedback on how useful their mediation was? Was their explanation clear enough? Relevant enough? Please rate their mediation skills by giving them 1-5 stars. You can also type a comment providing constructive feedback under each explanation. Ideally, they should be rated by ELE students (Spanish as a Foreign Language) or non-native speakers of Spanish, but all contributions are welcome.

As you can imagine, there is no need for you to listen to every single comment on every idiom: just listen to the ones that catch your eye, or any you might see which has not received much feedback yet.

Thank you!