Words to avoid in a writing task (B2-C1)- alternatives

If you’re writing an essay, report, article, formal letter/ email…and you find yourself using words such as ‘people’, ‘things’, ‘something’, ‘good’ or ‘bad’, please look at this infographic for alternatives:

Click on the picture for a larger version

Click here for a pdf version of the infographic.

Or better still, if you are not pressed for time, go to a thesaurus, like the Oxford Thesaurus, and you will be able to find a more accurate synonym, depending on the context and the exact notion you want convey (the exact meaning of the word you’re looking for).

Further tips to improve your writing:

vocabulary to talk about charts, graphs and diagrams

If you need to describe charts or graphs, for example, from an infographic, or relay information as part of a mediation activity, it might be useful for you to know some of the language related to this field. You can watch the video to get some more expressions to indicate “increase” or “decrease”, paying special attention to pronunciation, and the differences between some of these expressions.

 

You can view the slides here.

Some examples of how data can be relayed in real contexts (news):

A government report says a sharp rise in the use of crack cocaine in England is being fuelled by aggressive marketing by drug dealers and shrinking police numbers. The Home Office and Public Health England examined what lay behind the increase, which has been blamed for a surge in knife crime and serious violence. Our home affairs correspondent Danny Shaw has been looking at the findings

(Source)

What a teacher’s life is really like…

Forget about the clichés about teachers (holidays, short working hours…). Would you like to know what a teacher’s life is really like? Don’t ask them: ask their loved ones, those around them.

This was the prompt for an activity with one of my groups: how would your partners/children/friends describe your work and its implications in your personal life? With their contributions, we came up with this infographic. Do you agree with their conclusions? Would you add any others?

literary classics year 1: step 2- infographics about books

The next step in our project is to get to know the basic elements of the book in hand (genre, themes, plot summary, characters), and to be able to summarise them in an infographic. These are two of the examples made by students (click on the picture for full size):